Recommended New Releases: Father John Misty, JD Mcpherson, Ty Segall

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Father John Misty – I love you Honeybear
Honeybear is conflicted music that leaves me with conflicted feelings. Tillman is funny, but his humor is driven by meanness and self-loathing; he’s sweet, but he can’t manage to say anything nice without smothering it in jokes, like a dog compulsively trying to cover up its own shit. He opens the album by forecasting the apocalypse but most of the time comes off as the kind of mystic who gives up and embraces the debauchery, the patrician in some yoga sex ring, a bimbo Nero who fiddles while Los Angeles burns and occasionally gets sidetracked gloating about how hot his wife is. Yes, he gets high, but he never really leaves the dirty, dirty ground. Read the full review on Pitchfork
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JD Mcphereson – Let the Good Times Roll
Little, crucial details open up McPherson’s sound on Let The Good Times Roll. His bassist and right-hand man, Jimmy Sutton, goes electric in the title track, giving the band a push in rave-up mode. In “It’s All Over But The Shouting,” McPherson and Neill play around with essential ’50s recording techniques like echo, making them weirder than before. “Bridgebuilder,” the ballad McPherson wrote with Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, hearkens back to pre-rock pop and doo-wop. “The All-American” reminds McPherson’s fans that he’s only one man in a long lineage with its direct nod to the great post-punk rock band The Blasters. Read the full review on NPR

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Ty Segall – Live in San Francisco
Ty Segall Band’s Live in San Francisco is the fifth installment in the series. This isn’t his first live record (that was 2011’s Live in Aisle Five) and it’s not even his first appearance in the series (his prog-loving side project, Fuzz, was also included), but it’s an important addition. Along with Castle Face co-founder John Dwyer and his band Thee Oh Sees, Segall was a defining voice in the city’s late ’00s garage rock bubble and he and Dwyer are also, arguably, its most popular exports. And while it’s clear that Segall is prolific—he’s put out a double LP and a singles collection just within the last six months—this record isn’t filler. Read the full review on Pitchfork